How counselors help survivors of terrorist attacks and other tragedies.

President Barack Obama, French President Francois Hollande, second from right, and Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo arrive at the Bataclan, site of one of the Paris terrorists attacks, to pay their respects to the victims after Obama arrived in town for the COP21 climate change conference early on Monday, November 30, in Paris.

An important step in counseling people affected by tragic events is to help them realize that their emotions are normal. The ultimate goal is for survivors to regain a daily routine. Read more at http://ow.ly/UO94b or at http://www.cnn.com/2015/11/17/health/how-counselors-help-survivors-of-terrorist-attacks/index.html?utm_source=hootsuite

Prepare now for a disaster.

When parents tackle difficult conversations, they let their children know that they are available and supportive.

With the threat of hurricanes and severe weather, now is a good time to think of how you can successfully prepare for hurricanes and other natural disasters. It’s human nature to think the odds are in our favor and disaster won’t strike us. The reality is that at some point we all face some type of emergency for which a little advance planning can be enormously helpful. Disasters may be out of our control, but each of us does have control over our preparations and responses. Being prepared can provide a sense of control about your ability to manage the unexpected. It’s human nature to think the odds are in our favor and disaster won’t strike us. The reality is that at some point we all face some type of emergency for which a little advance planning can be enormously helpful. Disasters may be out of our control, but each of us does have control over our preparations and responses. Being prepared can provide a sense of control about your ability to manage the unexpected. Read more at http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/index.aspx

Trauma is an emotional response to a terrible event like an accident, rape or natural disaster.

Trauma

Immediately after the event, shock and denial are typical. Longer term reactions include unpredictable emotions, flashbacks, strained relationships and even physical symptoms like headaches or nausea. While these feelings are normal, some people have difficulty moving on with their lives. Psychologists can help these individuals find constructive ways of managing their emotions. Adapted from the APA Help Center article, “Recovering emotionally from disaster.” Read more at http://www.apa.org/topics/trauma/index.aspx

Disasters, from natural events such as hurricanes or earthquakes, to human-caused incidents such as mass shootings or terrorist attacks, are typically unexpected and overwhelming.

 Natural disasters

Even when you’re not hurt physically, disasters can take an emotional toll. Normal reactions may include intense, unpredictable feelings; trouble concentrating or making decisions; disrupted eating and sleeping patterns; emotional upsets on anniversaries or other reminders; strained personal relationships; and physical symptoms such as headaches, nausea or chest pain. Psychological research shows that many people are able to successfully recover from disaster. Taking active steps to cope is important. Read more at http://www.apa.org/topics/disasters/index.aspx

VIDEO: Tips for Managing Distress in the Aftermath of a Shooting.

Constant news coverage of the tragedy in Texas amplifies the shock, sadness, and anxiety many people experience in the wake of a mass shooting. Here are some tips to help lessen the emotional impact of this continual barrage of distressing information. View video at https://www.facebook.com/AmericanPsychologicalAssociation/videos/10155838800992579/