ACA DISASTER MENTAL HEALTH RESOURCES.

TraumaDisaster

ACA DISASTER MENTAL HEALTH RESOURCES

The following resources were compiled by the ACA Traumatology Interest Network, facilitated by Karin Jordan. They are a base platform for learning about the skills for dealing with disaster mental health.

NON-ACA TRAUMA AND DISASTER RESOURCES

The following external resources were compiled by ACA Staff. These can be used as a resource for learning more about disaster mental health or to find assistance when experiencing distress.

National Institute of Health:
Disaster Information Management Research Center
National Institute of Mental Health

University of California, Davis:
Child Reactions to Trauma

The National Child Traumatic Stress Network:
12 Core Concepts for Understanding Traumatic Stress Responses in Children and Families
Age-Related Reactions to a Traumatic Event

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA):
Warning Signs and Risk Factors for Emotional Distress
Recognizing and Treating Child Traumatic Stress
Disaster Distress Hotline Brochure (PDF)

SHELTERING IN PLACE RESOURCE

Working in conjunction with the American Red Cross and other mental health associations, Stephanie Dailey compiled these guidelines for Sheltering-in-Place. The American Counseling Association wishes to express its gratitude to Ms. Dailey for her time and efforts.

Sheltering-in-Place guidelines (PDF)

https://www.counseling.org/knowledge-center/trauma-disaster#disaster

Prepare now for a disaster.

When parents tackle difficult conversations, they let their children know that they are available and supportive.

With the threat of hurricanes and severe weather, now is a good time to think of how you can successfully prepare for hurricanes and other natural disasters. It’s human nature to think the odds are in our favor and disaster won’t strike us. The reality is that at some point we all face some type of emergency for which a little advance planning can be enormously helpful. Disasters may be out of our control, but each of us does have control over our preparations and responses. Being prepared can provide a sense of control about your ability to manage the unexpected. It’s human nature to think the odds are in our favor and disaster won’t strike us. The reality is that at some point we all face some type of emergency for which a little advance planning can be enormously helpful. Disasters may be out of our control, but each of us does have control over our preparations and responses. Being prepared can provide a sense of control about your ability to manage the unexpected. Read more at http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/index.aspx

VIDEO: Tips for Managing Distress in the Aftermath of a Shooting.

Constant news coverage of the tragedy in Texas amplifies the shock, sadness, and anxiety many people experience in the wake of a mass shooting. Here are some tips to help lessen the emotional impact of this continual barrage of distressing information. View video at https://www.facebook.com/AmericanPsychologicalAssociation/videos/10155838800992579/

Disaster Relief Hotline. Counselors are available to assist you 24/7.

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Are you experiencing difficulty concentrating, depression, sadness, headaches, stomachaches, difficulty sleeping or increased drug/alcohol use? Call the Disaster Relief Hotline at 1-800-981-0023 (1-888-672-7622 TDD). Counselors are available to assist you 24/7.

¿Padece de dificultades para concentrarse, depresión, tristeza, dolores de cabeza, problemas estomacales, dificultad para dormir o ha aumentado el consumo de drogas y alcohol? Llame a la línea de Ayuda por Desastre al 1-800-981-0023 (1-888-672-7622 TDD). Consejeros disponibles 24/7.

In the midst of profound and complex grief following a natural disaster, these principles can guide you when helping others. (From Next Avenue).

Natural Disaster

How to Really Help Someone After a Natural Disaster

How to support people after their world has been turned upside down.

Our country has recently been devastated by one natural disaster after another, including hurricanes, floods, wildfires and major earthquakes just to the south of us in Mexico. Thousands of people have lost property. Some have lost loved ones. Others have lost their jobs. People from coast to coast have generously donated money and supplies to those affected. Such efforts will be ongoing, as survivors gradually try to rebuild, re-organize and put the pieces of their lives back together. At the same time, there is a deeper experience that goes beyond the physical and material needs. All of those affected by the natural disasters are grieving, and that grief will not be over in a day, a month or even years to come. Let’s look at the underlying issues of grief and what you can do to help those you know or love who were pummeled by the force of the natural disasters. Read more at http://www.nextavenue.org/help-someone-after-natural-disaster/?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=pbsofficial

The national Disaster Distress Helpline.

Have you been impacted by a #hurricane? The national Disaster Distress Helpline provides 24/7 emotional support. #TalkWithUs at 1-800-985-5990. #Harvey #Irma #Maria